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October 2017
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In the magazine
Only available in print
  • The Facilities 50
    Jon Creamer launches Televisual's 30th exclusive annual Facilities 50 survey featuring the top post production houses in the UK and 52 pages of analysis of the sector
  • Interview: Grant Mansfield
    Hiring top talent and investing heavily in development have been key to growing his Bristol indie Plimsoll Productions, says founder Grant Mansfield
  • The clear view: lenses
    What ever genre you work in, you need to be lens savvy. Here three DoPs guide us through the lens market, picking out the models they like to use in drama and factual
  • Over the top
    The growth of Netflix and Amazon is proving a boon for UK indies, but broadcasters are starting to panic. Tim Dams reports
From the magazine
Available to read online
  • Blue Planet II
    The producers of Blue Planet II tell Tim Dams how tech advances and military planning helped them capture the secrets of the deep
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Reports&
surveys

Salary Survey 2016 Back to Reports & survey Listing

One of the most striking facts to emerge from the Televisual Salary Survey is the discrepancy between median pay for men and women. This has been a persistent feature of the survey since it began, and shows no sign of improving. In fact, the gap – which stands at £12,500 – is worse than it was last year.

Median earnings are lower for women at most levels in the industry. A female AP at a TV indie can expect £32k, while a male AP is likely to earn £37k. A female producer has a median salary of £40k; for a man it is £46.5k.  A female producer director will be on  £54.6k, while a man is on £60k; for series producers it is £52.2k and £70k respectively.

Many women believe they are being paid less than their male counterparts. “There is a definite pay gap between males and females in production roles, particularly shooters,” says one female AP. A female editor adds: “I know for a fact they pay me less than my male counterparts.”

She is likely to be right. Our figures show that a female offline editor typically earns a media salary of £32.5k, while her male counterpart takes home £55k.

Tellingly, one of the few jobs where a woman is likely to earn more than a man is higher up the production foodchain, at executive producer level. A female executive producer can expect £95k, while a man earns a median salary of £87k.

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