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June 2018
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In the magazine
Only available in print
  • Live and direct
    From concerts to cup finals and ceremonial occasions, live events are increasingly important to broadcasters. Tim Dams reports
  • Cutting comments
    In advance of EditFest London 2018, four editors from the worlds of live action and animation who’ve shaped films from Top Gun to Wonderwoman 
to Sweeney Todd, tell Jon Creamer what it takes to create the perfect cut
  • All the World's a stage
    …And nowhere more than the UK, where studios are coping with an unprecedented demand for studio space from TV and film productions. Pippa Considine reports
  • Let's get high
    From the shoot to final delivery, Michael Burns discovers the best route to HDR
  • Tools of the trade
    Televisual’s annual Production Technology Survey reveals the kit that producers are using to make their content – and what they think of it. Jon Creamer reports
  • Get some focus
    Major changes in the camera market have 
made lens choice more important than 
ever. Phil Rhodes runs through some of 
the best options for programme makers
From the magazine
Available to read online
  • The art of the edit
    In advance of EditFest London 2018, four editors from the worlds of live action and animation tell Jon Creamer what it takes to create the perfect cut
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Reports&
surveys

The Art Of The DP Back to Reports & survey Listing

Ed Wild
Fleming, Prisoners of the Sun, Welcome to the Punch, Chalet Girl, Shifty



Making a film is a balancing act, but everyone involved just wants to make a great film. Sometimes people’s views differ on how a great film should be made, particularly in prep. These conversations are absolutely vital to the filmmaking process because in amongst all the viewpoints of these talented and committed people there is the heart of the film you’re all trying to find. Sometimes passions run high in these conversations and listening is a more important talent than speaking. But when you do speak, make sure your argument holds together, rather than just voicing an opinion simply only to have voiced an opinion. Because time is precious and hot air wastes time. Being a DP is a wonderful crossover between the creative and the technical. I always start in the creative form, as I read the script, themes and visual ideas come to me. I mull over the ideas, discuss them with the director, and then later you creatively use your technical knowledge to achieve those things. But technique should never override the ultimate aim of emotionally connecting the audience to the film.

Learn to light sets by travelling loads and look at how light falls everywhere from the mundane to the extraordinary location. Shoot loads of stills. Try and build up a library of stills, films and paintings – you’ll not only learn a lot, you’ll get a sense of the aesthetics that make you happy. You’ll also have a library of images that will help you communicate your ideas.

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